An open source app for the 'Gentse Feesten'

Every year, my hometown Ghent, hosts its annual festival called the Gentse Feesten. 10 days - actually, 11, if you count the unofficial pre-friday day - the city will barely sleep.

One of the hardest things is to actually figure out where you want to go during one of these days. There is the official website and there is also an official app available, but we decided, for several reasons, to write our own, open sourced and native application. The data is grabbed and available at http://data.gent.be. Open data and open source, a perfect match.

After a couple of brainstorms and iterations on the design, we released the first versions so you can start planning your events and have them available at any time.

You can install the Android version from Google Play, the iOS version from the iTunes store, the Firefox OS app in the Firefox Market (make sure you go Worldwide), the Windows mobile from Windows mobile store and Windows 8 in Windows 8 store.

Features include:

  • Built with speed in mind: native written application.
  • Works offline after initially downloading the program (around 2.5MB).
  • List of favorites: handy list so you can easily see what todo on which day.
  • Free text and facet style search.
  • Share functionality: integrates with installed applications on your platform.
  • Maps integration when online.
  • Location - what's going on around me
  • Parking availability

In case you have an Android device, the program will be downloaded in the background on the first start. On iOS, you can start browsing immediately.

Collaborate

The code is freely available on GitHub, so anyone can easily send bug reports, interface translations or create pull requests to make the applications even better. The services are currently our own, so you need to setup those yourself first. Note that there are also some implementation differences between the platforms.

Proudly built by @swentel, @TimLeytens, @leenvs, @janyves and @AppCreativity.

So, who will make the Windows mobile (done!) and Firefox (Done too!) version ?

Why you should come to DrupalCon Prague

First of all: I'm a featured speaker. I'll be hosting a session called 'Drupal 8 for Site Builders'. Come and watch to get an overview of all the wonders and power Drupal 8 has for creating a site. However, there are other reasons to attend DrupalCon Prague, and they are not Drupal related at all.

Kutná Hora

Kutná Hora is a little town, about 80 kilometers away from Prague, world known for its Sedlec ossuary which contains a lot of human bones, used for decorating the inside. While this may sound luguber, a visit to this small chapel is not something you will ever forget. And if you don't go inside, the top of the chapel has a skull, they really thought about everything. The easiest way to get there is by train and even arriving in the small station is worth travelling. I have seen it already, but will be going again, so feel free to join me.

CERN opendays

CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is opening its doors on 28th and 29th of september for the public for it so called CERN opendays. CERN lies in Geneva, Switserland, about 8 hours driving from Prague, or maybe 1 hour flying by plane. You'll be able to go down 100 meters underground and look at the Large Hadron collider and all other amazingly cool experiments scientists and engineers perform. Unless you are Daniel "dawehner" Wehner, you don't get that many chances to visit this place in your lifetime, especially since they only open it up publicly every 4 years. Tickets are for sale starting August, so keep an eye on the website if you want to go. That means I won't be attending the post-sprints, but honestly, I can live with that.

Live commit of the Field API to CMI patch at Frontend United

At BADCamp 2011 in San Francisco, Yves Chedemois, Greg Dunlap and I sat down to talk how we'd have to convert Field API to the configuration system that is now in Drupal 8.

Fast forward to April 13 2013. After months of hard work, with initial work done at DrupalCon Munich, the patch was finally ready to be committed. The Drupal core maintainers agreed that Alex Pott and I could commit this patch live on stage at Frontend United! And I had the honor of pushing the final button. I'll never be closer than this being a core comitter :)

Graham Taylor (@g_taylor) captured it all on video. 5 minutes of Drupal History.

We can use your help

But we're not done yet. A lot of work still needs to be done for Field API to be ready for Drupal 8. We've setup a site which collects the most important patches. So bookmark following site and pick your favorite topic: http://realize.be/field-api/

Thanks to everyone involved, with special mentions to Yves Chedemois (@yched), Alex Pott (@alexpott), Jess Myrbo (@xjmdrupal) and Greg Dunlap (@heyrocker).

Topics 

drupal, field api, planet

Introducing Field formatter conditions for Drupal

The Field formatter conditions module for Drupal allows you to add conditions and actions per field on the manage display screens of entities (nodes, users etc). For example: you can hide a field on path x. Or hide it when the current user has role 'Administrator'. The module ships with several built-in conditions and actions for common use cases we encountered during projects at work. And thanks to jpstrikesback a couple of more will be added before we hit a 1.0 release.

It's easy to write your own specific use cases for a project, consult the API or look into the code how to built a form, condition and callback yourself in a few minutes. Field API and Display Suite fields are supported, Field API's extra fields are not, and most likely neither in the future.

Rules support

It gets better though. The API is limited to the fact that a callback is both the condition and the action. But what in case you want more conditions ? That's where Rules comes into play. You can build unlimited rules with fancy conditions and then fire off actions on a specific field. Currently, the module ships with two rules actions which can hide a field or change the image style of an image formatter. The event for these rules always needs to be 'A field is rendered'. Depending on the use cases, more will be added later, but it's easy for developers to write their own actions targeted for a specific project.

See it in action

See how it works in a short screencast. Happy conditioning and a very good new year!

Help out with Field API for Drupal 8

Last week, I attended the Field API pre Drupalcon sprint in Munich. My major motivation was to start working on the conversion of Field API to CMI and little than a week later, we have a patch that is green. While there's still a lot of work on it, it's still a good feeling after one week of hacking and discussions. After driving 8 hours home after a fantastic week, I decided to step up as a co-maintainer of Field API. But me stepping up won't make the big difference, we need more people joining us!

Anyone can help in many different ways

  • Gardening the queue: go through bug reports, ask for more info when something is not clear or close duplicates.
  • You can work on an issue by creating patches. Assign an issue to yourself so we know who's working on it.
  • Help by reviewing and testing patches to see if they actually work as intented.
  • Come bring us coffee and cake :)

Where should I start ?

There's a lot of work, that's for sure: CMI, widget and formatter plugins, Field API vs OO and so on. We have a site which lists the most important issues: http://realize.be/field-api - Bookmark that if you're interested!

We are also available on freenode.net on #drupal-fieldapi in case you have any questions.

How much time should I invest in this ?

That is totally up to you. Remember, this is voluntary work, so we do not expect anybody to work 40 hours a week - although that would be more than fantastic of course :) As an example, this is roughly what I think my weekly schedule will look like:

  1. Continue working further on the CMI patch. I have sponsored time from Wunderkraut so I can focus hard on getting this critical piece of functionality in. Goodbye field_config and field_config_instance tables!
  2. Go through the queue twice a week for about an hour and review existing patches from other people.
  3. Go through the queue twice a week for half an hour and close duplicates or ask for more info.
  4. Pick one 'quick win' issue per week to create a patch from it, either a bug or feature request.
  5. Work on Display Suite issue queue, this usually happens once a week for about 3 hours. Been like that since forever.

So wait, I thought you didn't sleep?

Yes I do, and I do other things as well. It's not worth spending all your nights on coding, you'll get burned out before you know it. But wouldn't it be great to go to sleep and someone else was doing some great work ?

So, who's helping along?

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